Wednesday, January 18, 2012

The GI Plan Diet: For People Who Hate Dieting by Andrew Mason

We can be overwhelmed with a variety of different dietary plans and sometimes we feel as if we have tried and failed at each one. It's little wonder that we are confused as some plans call for us to eat only protein, while others tell us to avoid protein altogether and simply stick to carbohydrates. These dietary plans are all around us and everybody seems to have their own opinion. Some people tell us that the diet should be centered around the glycemic index and specifically to focus on foods that are at the low end of that scale. This type of food is known to avoid the adverse effects associated with high blood sugar levels.

We can find several different dietary plans that are focused on the concept of low glycemic rankings. For instance, the South Beach diet is one of these. In addition, a lower GI diet is good for regulating the symptoms of diabetes and helping to control weight fluctuations in those who are unfortunate to have this disease.

A dietary plan must be focused on the individual. We all have to go through a process of trial and error until we find out what is right for us and we will often need to sample different diets along the way. It can help to seek out the services of a registered dietitian to make the process a little simpler.

Why is a glycemic index-based diet better for us? Mainly because we are able to see what effect a particular carbohydrate has on the human body. We know that some are digested more quickly and lead to blood glucose level spikes - this is known as a glycemic response. The response leads to creation of fat reserves and elevated levels of insulin, as well. These conditions are to be avoided at all cost.

The glycemic response varies according to the quantity of the carbohydrate that you eat, as well as its origin, whether it is processed or not and even how it is prepared and cooked. There is sometimes a considerable difference between a particular food consumed in its raw state, compared to when it is cooked.

Foods found at the bottom of the glycemic index are some of the healthiest and nutrient filled of all. It is here that we find a large variety of vegetables, fruits and beans that should be at the core of a glycemic diet plan. Be careful to study the index though as certain foods are not as "good" as others. For example, cooked carrots or ripened bananas can rank fairly highly on the scale.

Balance a dietary plan based on complex carbohydrates and vegetables from the low end of the glycemic index, together with a healthy amount of lean protein. Control your portions of chicken and fish. Do remember that fish is recommended as it has many health benefits associated with its fatty properties and all-important Omega-3 fatty acids. Always enjoy your diet and remember that moderation is the key, so you might find some of those simple carbs in your mix as well.