Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Common Sense Tips to Help Stop Snoring by Gordie Guide

The majority of us have been guilty of snoring at one time or another. Though it can be a serious problem for some, most of us fall into the category of the occasional snorer.

Here are a few tips that may help you to stop snoring naturally with just a few minor adjustments to your nightly routine.

Retraining - Avoid breathing through the your mouth. An open mouth drops the jaw and once this happens the tongue recedes into the mouth. As soon as you catch yourself breathing through your mouth start breathing through your nose. This will help to unconsciously train your body to do this automatically.

Positions - An early tool for preventing snoring was a simple tennis ball sewn into the back of a pajama top. When you rolled over onto the ball it became uncomfortable and you immediately turned back to your side. You can certainly try this route or instead try pillows. Sleep on your side with a pillow between your legs and one placed behind your back. This position keeps you on your side and allows your mouth to stay closed reducing your chances of snoring.

Moisture - Lubricate your nasal passage. If you have a cold or suffer with allergies keep your nose and throat lubricated. Throat sprays can help to put moisture into your throat and keeping a humidifier by your bed will keep your airway moist and your nasal passages clear.

Nasal Strips - Using a Nasal Separator. Separating the nostrils with a nasal separator is another effective treatment by opening and separating the nostrils for more airflow. They are inexpensive and are readily available for adults and even for children.

Routine - Establish a regular sleep regimen. When you become over tired or carry a sleep debt your ability to have a restful sleep diminishes. When this happens, your deep sleep becomes irregular and if already susceptible, your snoring will intensify.

Alcohol - Stop drinking alcohol before bed. A partial collapse of the airway occurs when the throat muscles are are relaxed. This creates an airflow blockage and snoring will often begin.

Smoking - Smoking changes the structure of your nasal cells which causes swelling of the air passages and the production of mucus in the nose. With clogged passages air cannot move freely. Smoking has also been attributed to causing sleep apnea which is a severe form of snoring requiring medical intervention.

Weight - Weight loss can also greatly reduce or even eliminate snoring. The less flesh surrounding your throat, the easier for air to flow.

While losing weight, drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes may be habits you might not want to forgo, your symptoms will certainly reduce as your overall health improves.

The bottom line is if you have nasal congestion, take a decongestant. If you have allergies, treat them. And stay away from sleeping pills or anything that relaxes your muscles too much.

As is most things in life, there isn't a one size fits all approach to treat occasional snoring. With a little time, effort and some minor retraining you will eventually find what works for you.